Housing First - The Solution to Ireland's Homelessness Crisis?

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Month on month figures reveal that more and more men, women and children are finding their way onto our streets with no home to call their own. We need a change of strategy to effectively address the homelessness crisis in Ireland.

The government’s strategy in dealing with homelessness has been to provide short-term emergency accommodation through local authorities. Yes, this is better than doing nothing at all for people who find themselves with nowhere to go. But is it effective? Does it give people the platform to grow and make a life for themselves and their family? Does the current programme try to figure out why people are in their current situation and take proactive action to ensure that they and future generations will never have to face homelessness again? Unfortunately, the answer to these questions is no. It really is a case of putting a band-aid on a bullet wound.

Housing First - Ireland’s Alternative
Homeless services in Ireland generally operate on a staircase recovery model. In short, those seeking to be housed must prove their worth. For example, this can be done by living continuously in a homeless shelter while completing an addiction course or rehabilitation programme to prove one’s suitability for a home if substance abuse is identified as an issue. However, without a home one could only imagine the daily struggles you would face, mental and physical. The expectation of then entering and working your way up through the staircase model to secure housing is an unrealistic means to select those who need a home.

The Housing First Model sees the stairways recovery model as having the order backwards. The stages of the Housing First Model are:

Firstly, supply the person in question with a home of their own.

Immediately a specially dedicated care team give supports such as counselling or treatment for substance abuse to the new tenants if that is an identified inhibitor.

With continued support tenants develop the skills and resilience needed to sustain and flourish in their life and new home.

It is a simple model and the central premise makes perfect sense. Give someone a home and you’ll give them security and a platform to build from. Then the issues surrounding why such a person became homeless in the first place and how to avoid future homelessness can be addressed through the care team. This eventually leads to the full independent living of the tenant in receipt of the home.

The statistics back up the theory of the Housing First Model. In 2008, Finland adopted the Housing First Model and has eliminated long-term homelessness there. In Utah, USA, the implementation of the Housing First Model resulted in a 72% reduction in the numbers classified as long-term homeless in its first 9 years. Today, long-term homelessness has been eradicated in Utah.

In 2011, a shift towards the Housing First Model to alleviate long term homelessness was published in the Programme for Government. Currently only 1% of the national homeless budget is allocated to the Housing First Model. It is imperative that the government allocates more funding towards the Housing First Model so that charities and local authorities can tackle Ireland’s homelessness crisis effectively.

Sources:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/inspired-life/wp/2015/04/17/the-surprisingly-simple-way-utah-solved-chronic-homelessness-and-saved-millions/?tid=a_inl&utm_term=.fa36481b5554

http://www.thejournal.ie/housing-first-homelessness-3208123-Jan2017/

https://www.rte.ie/news/ireland/2017/1106/917728-housing-mcverry-report/

LIKECHARITY's Video Production Launch!

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LIKECHARITY are now offering full scale Video Production Services. We want to make it easier for charities to create high quality video content to connect with supporters online, so we’re making it easy and affordable for charities to access professional video production services. We have devised a simple 5 step process that makes it easy for charities to make great video content in a fast and efficient way.

Why is Video Content so Important?

Video content is an unrivalled means of engaging with potential donors. Getting supporters to share your message on social media should be at the top of all charities social media strategy. Great video content on social media generates 1,200% more shares than text and image posts, meaning it’s a medium that must be utilised to get the most from your social media marketing.

When supporters share your content a whole new network can be reached organically. Posts that generate supporter engagement through shares can translate into real results for a charity such as increased brand awareness, brand engagement and with a clear call-to-action, can directly result in donations. Not surprisingly, it has a higher ROI than any other marketing communication method.

Some of the videos you can create using our new service are:

  • Overview - Use this type of video to find new supporters by telling people about who you are and what you do.
  • Founding Story - Engage people emotionally by telling a personal founders story and educate your supporters about why you do what you do.
  • Your Donation - Say ‘Thank You’ to your supporters by making an explainer video about how you spend their money and let them know the difference their support makes.
  • Testimonial - Why not ask a service user to tell people in their own words what difference your organisation has made to their lives. Recruit volunteers by having someone tell others about why they give up their time to volunteer for you.

If you have an idea for a video let us know and we will work with you to make this idea come to life.

Pricing

The service costs €1000 plus 13.5% VAT (T’s&C’s Apply) for new original content or a reduced edit-only rate of €780 plus 13.5% VAT if you already have photo/ video assets in house.

Longer format, Cinema, TV, Corporate and Competition videos are priced on a per project basis.

In addition to our Digital Video Service, we are also offering bespoke commercial content. This is priced on a per job basis and covers:

  • Longer format digital video advertisements.
  • TV commercials.
  • Cinema commercials.
  • Bespoke corporate partner and competitions videos.

If you'd like to know more please contact deirdre.mullen@likecharity.com or jason.branagan@likecharity.com.

 

#GivingTuesday 2017

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#GivingTuesday has become a worldwide phenomenon since it began in 2012. The idea of the campaign came about when two charities, The 92nd Street Y and the United Nations Foundation, came together. Their goal was to remind people of the importance of giving around the holiday season.

Black Friday and Cyber Monday have become monumental days for consumer spending the world over and so the message was put out to give a little back after you get a little for yourself. With this in mind #GivingTuesday takes place every year on the first Tuesday after Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

#GivingTuesday was celebrated in over 98 countries in 2016 and raised $177 million dollars in online donations for charities around the world. The success of the campaign is fuelled by the power of social media and collaboration between all charities to promote the #GivingTuesday across all social media platforms.

To date, #GivingTuesday has failed to capture the imagination of the Irish public. The rewards of such a campaign could be instrumental in raising much needed funds. And the beauty of it is that many charities already have the resources necessary to run a successful #GivingTuesday campaign:

  • Social media accounts - Twitter, Facebook, Instagram
  • Text-to-donate service
  • A donations page
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This year #GivingTuesday takes place on Tuesday November 28th. The day is fast approaching and it’s time to get the word out. The key to the success of the campaign will be a collaborative approach by all charities to get the word out and spread the #GivingTuesday message. This is the year Ireland will embrace #GivingTuesday!

The #GivingTuesday website offers loads of great resources and tool-kits to guide you on your way to a successful #GivingTuesday campaign. This includes freely available #GivingTuesday logos, ideas, and templates to help promote and run your campaign.

We are only a small nation famed for punching above our weight. Ireland was announced as the second most generous country in Europe in CAF World Giving Index. This year let’s show the world what we can do on #GivingTuesday and get us to the number one spot!

If you would like to get involved why not text a donation to one of over 250 charities listed here.

Sources:
https://www.givingtuesday.org/
https://www.cafonline.org/about-us/publications/2016-publications/caf-world-giving-index-2016

Excited to Launch a New Way for Charities to Accept Donations!

LIKECHARITY is excited to offer a new mobile optimised credit card donation page for charities. Charities can send their supporters to a customised page to collect donations via credit card. This product was created after listening to charity feedback and we can't wait to see charities using it in upcoming fundraising campaigns!

Features include:

  • Easy to set-up
  • Tracking & insights
  • Secure donations
  • Social media integration
  • Optimised for mobile devices
  • Real-time status page  

If you've any questions please get in touch with deirdre.mullen@likecharity.com

Cyber Crime Prevention For Charities

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Over the past number of years cybercrime has become a menace to the global economy. Ireland has seen a dramatic spike in cyber crime activities in recent years. In 2014 the cost of cyber crime in Ireland alone was €498,000. By 2016 this figure jumped to €1.7 million and will rise in the coming years. Industry sectors such as financial services and government agencies have had their battle with cybercrime well documented. But charities have not been immune to this for example with the Trinity Foundation, the fundraising arm of Trinity College Dublin, suffering a cyber security attack in April 2017.

 

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The impact of cyber security is two-fold. When an organisation falls victim to a cyber attack the immediate concern is generally the financial impact it would have. However, the long-term damage a cyber attack can have on a charity’s reputation is of much more concern. The protection of personal data is at the forefront of the public’s concerns when dealing with companies and charities alike. E-mail addresses of donors being passed on to 3rd parties is a simple example of a breach of the GDPR that many charities could fall foul of unwittingly and show the gaps in a charities cyber security. As well as the loss of donor trust, failure by a charity to adhere to the incoming GDPR could result in fines of up to €10 million or 2% of annual turnover for serious breaches of the regulations. Cybercrime can take many forms and it is critical that charities are aware of the threats so they can take corrective action to minimise the threat.

 

Types of Cybercrime

 

Ransomware is a type of malicious software that encrypts data in a user's PC so that it is no longer accessible. Fraudsters demand a fee in order for the affected user to receive an encryption key and free up access to their data once more. Ransomware attacks most commonly occur because an unsuspecting employee inadvertently opens a mail attachment.  

 

Ransomware attacks have the ability to cripple an organisation's ability to operate and so preventative action must be taken in advance to avoid such a scenario:

 

  • Charities must securely backup their data. If such an attack was to occur the charity could restore their network from the backed up data and continue to operate.
  • Proper staff training on what to look out for. It also important to remember that a charity’s volunteers are treated the same as full-time staff members in relation to GDPR. This means that it is the responsibility of the charity to train its volunteers the same way it trains their staff.
  • Develop a comprehensive response strategy to a ransomware attack. The old saying ‘Fail to prepare, prepare to fail’ comes to mind.

 

Spear phishing is the use of highly personalised fake e-mails that are targeted at a specific individual in an organisation. A fraudster masquerading as the CFO or COO of an organisation instructing an employee to transfer funds to another bank account is example of how such an attack can affect an unsuspecting victim. In October 2016, Meath County Council fell victim to a spear phishing attack. Cyber criminals masqueraded as a chief executive of Meath County Council and instructed a junior staff member to transfer funds to an oversea account. In all, €4.3 million was stolen from Meath County Council. In this case the transfer was flagged as suspicious and with minutes to spare a bank account in Hong Kong was frozen that had secured the funds from Meath County Council. This was a lucky escape and should be a lesson to all organisations regarding e-mail communication of financial and sensitive information and how it should be communicated securely. This was also the tactic employed in the aforementioned Trinity Foundation case earlier this year.

 

Once again the best and most cost effective measures to prevent such an attack is to inform, train and educate staff and volunteers on the signs to look out for. Have a specific protocol in place and stick to it when discussing sensitive or financial information via e-mail. That way any unusual e-mails should jump right out at you, be flagged and acted upon immediately. This combined with utilizing an e-mail protection solution should have you well prepared for such an attack..

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Protecting Your Data

The implementation of the much discussed EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is fast approaching. All charities operating in Ireland will be affected. It is being enforced so that EU citizens data is protected correctly and ethically. This will ensure companies and charities alike are protected against potential cyber threats. The key thing to remember about the GDPR is that you must be seen to actively working towards being compliant. Previously you would only be inspected by the Data Protection Commissioner if they was data breach or a suspected one. Under the GDPR you can be inspected at anytime, you don’t have to be perfect but if you’re not seen to be working towards being compliant then you will be in trouble.

 

For charities here are a number of specific challenges you  will face when becoming compliant with the GDPR:

 

Resourcing challenges - For most charities they will not have the resources to employ a full time Data Protection Officer to ensure compliance with the GDPR.

Training challenge - Having access to the correct and most up-to-date data protection laws and having the staff available to mentor others in the organisation on compliance with these regulations will be a challenge for many charities.

Policies - Having the correct policies and procedures in place will be another time-consuming challenge. The GDPR will require charities to show evidence of their updated policies in order to be compliant.

Employee and Volunteer data - Charities are reliant on their employees and volunteers to ensure they can provide the services and supports they do. With this all employee and volunteer training must be correctly recorded and securely stored. All those who volunteer must be trained in data protection protocol. This will be another strain on resources.

Data breaches - Any breaches of data security must be reported within 72 hours under the GDPR. Without the resources available for a Data Protection Officer charities could potentially struggle to identify and take the necessary actions required to rectify such a breach.

Outsourcing/ 3rd Parties - Many charities use 3rd parties to recruit volunteers for fundraising activities such as door-to-door and direct mail campaigns. It will be the charities responsibility to ensure that they know where this data is stored, that they keep processor logs and that the relevant processor agreements are in place.


 

Getting ready for the GDPR may appear quite daunting but the key thing to remember is that you need to seen to be compliant. The worst thing would be to have a data breach and not have policies, training and proper record keeping in place when you have to report the breach to the Data Protection Commissioner. However, if you are seen to be working towards being compliant with the GDPR you will be in a much stronger position.

 

So how to prepare for the GDPR? LIKECHARITY have partnered with Ireland’s leading data protection service provider Sytorus to offer the charity sector a customised solution called LIKECHARITY Privacy Engine. The partnership came about as we are using Privacy Engine to prepare for the GDPR and found it indispensable.  

 

This tool allows charities to:

  • Maintain all mandatory logs.
  • Train staff and measure their awareness.
  • Maintain all relevant policies and procedures.
  • Identify risks and assign tasks to others.
  • Interact live with an actual Data Protection expert to answer your ‘how do I’ questions.

 

The deadline for GDPR is only around the corner and you need to be preparing now, not after May. Click here to find out more about the reduced charity rate we have available for Privacy Engine.

 

Sources:

 

https://www.grantthornton.ie/globalassets/1.-member-firms/ireland/insights/publications/grant-thornton---cybercrime.pdf

 

https://www.irishtimes.com/business/economy/cyber-attacks-on-irish-businesses-soar-survey-shows-1.2615043

 

https://www.williamfry.com/newsandinsights/news-article/2016/06/08/key-impacts-of-the-eu-general-data-protection-regulation

 

http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/north-korean-cyber-gangs-blitz-irish-companies-with-almost-daily-attacks-36208986.html

 

http://www.universitytimes.ie/2017/04/money-lost-from-trinitys-philanthropic-branch-after-cyber-attack/

 

BUDGET 2018 - IMPLICATIONS FOR THE CHARITY SECTOR

The Minister for Finance, Pascal Donogue, delivered Budget 2018 on the 10th October 2017. The budget received a mixed reception from charity sector organisations. Although extra funding for vital services was secured through tireless lobbying by charitable organisations, many feel not enough was done to tackle Ireland’s social issues. The following is a sector by sector breakdown of what the budget means for charitable organisations and their work:

 

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Homelessness and the housing crisis

An additional €18 million funding for homeless services is welcome and will allow for homeless service providers to make more beds available in an attempt to alleviate Ireland’s growing homelessness crisis. However, it is questionable if this will be enough to make a significant impact as the crisis deepens at an unprecedented rate.

Across the board there was a welcomed increase in funding available for the Housing Assistance Payment (HAP) Scheme. Mr. O’Donoghue announced that an extra €149 million would be made available to the scheme in order to aid those struggling to make rental payments in the ever inflated private rental market. This is a preventative measure, rather than a reactionary measure, which is a more proactive approach to solving Ireland’s homeless crisis than in the recent past. The test of this measure will be private rental sector’s willingness to accept such payments by tenants struggling to make their spiralling rent.

Perhaps the most disappointing measure announced was the increased build of social housing. The announcement that 3,800 new social houses are to be built by the end of next year by local authorities and approved housing bodies was  a step in the right direction. However, when these figures were scrutinised by opposition parties and industry experts a different picture emerged. The 3,800 social housing homes promised by the Minister for Finance was already announced by Housing Minister Eoghan Murphy in September of this year. This actual increase from previously pledged social housing builds was thirty-one social houses.

 

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Health

The increased funding for the health service is seen as positive. In particular, extra funding for mental health services of €35 million is certainly a step in the right direction.

The need for extra funding for primary and social care by addressed in Budget 2018 is positive and should ensure more people in need of vital healthcare services get the treatment they need.

 

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Child Protection Services

The announcement of an extra €40 million funding for TUSLA can help to develop, support, promote the protection of welfare for children. The over 3,000 children now homeless in Ireland, TUSLA along with a number of other organisations can help alleviate this harrowing issue  by funding out of hours services and the employment of extra staff.

 

The Charities VAT Compensation Scheme

From 1 January 2018 the Charities VAT Compensation Scheme will take effect. This scheme entitles charities to reclaim VAT based on the level of non-public funding they receive. The total amount of claims in a year is capped at €5 million and claims valued below €500 will not qualify. In order for charities to avail of the scheme they must be registered with the Charity Regulator, have tax clearance and provide and provided audited accounts for the year in question.  

Over the coming year it will be interesting to see how significant an impact this budget will have. It will be the litmus test to reveal how seriously the government are taking the need to increase the services and protection of members in Irish society in need of assistance that is supplied by the charity and not-for-profit sectors.

 

Sources:

http://www.alustforlife.com/the-bigger-picture/government-fails-to-deliver-promised-funding-for-mental-health-in-budget-2018

https://www.pmvtrust.ie/peter-mcverry-trust-statement-budget-2018/

http://www.thejournal.ie/social-housing-budget-3639091-Oct2017/

http://www.wheel.ie/news/budget-2018-vat-refund-scheme-announced-charities

https://www.threshold.ie/news/2017/10/10/threshold-welcomes-increase-in-funding-for-housing/

 

Does the GDPR affect your charity?

This a guest post from Clare Deegan of Sytorus 

To mark exactly one year to go before the GDPR becomes enforced, the Irish Data Protection Data Protection Commissioner, Helen Dixon, took the airways of Morning Ireland in May to warn companies who still believe that the GDPR won’t impact their organisation. It has been our experience that charities have felt most impacted by the GDPR yet many charities still believe the GDPR won’t impact them.  Ms Dixon stated that ‘90% of small and medium sized business’ will be impacted by the GDPR and ‘fewer than half of these businesses being aware’; many small companies who believed the GDPR did not impact them sat up and took note. Ms Dixon’s position was clear ‘doing nothing means you are automatically out of compliance’ and ‘it won’t be possible to get ready in a few months’.  If you missed the interview, click here https://www.rte.ie/radio/utils/radioplayer/rteradioweb.html#!rii=b9%5F21178675%5F48%5F25%2D05%2D2017%5F

A number of charities have been in the firing line in recent years, and since charities exist on donations, it has never been more important to gain trust from your donors. The GDPR will impact marketing campaigns, fundraising and volunteers. If you are confident that your organisation is one of the 10% of organisations who are not impacted by the GDPR, then consider the following before you close the door:

  • Cookies: as Ms Dixon called out this example in her interview, it is worthy of being top of the list of your considerations. If your website collects Cookies, then, you are collecting personal information; therefore, you will be impacted by the GDPR.

  • Volunteers are employees: if you have even one employee on your books, then, you are a Data Controller; therefore, you will be impacted by the GDPR. In terms of training and access to personal data as held by the charity, volunteers must be adequately trained to handle and protect personal data. In many organisations, we have found that volunteers are amongst the highest risk, as they have excessive access to personal and sensitive personal data coupled with not having sufficient training on the handling of personal data. It is widely documented that 80% of breaches occur from the ‘intentional, non-malicious actions of a member of staff’. In charities, these actions are likely to be by volunteers. If you have volunteers processing personal data on your behalf, then you are impacted by the GDPR.

  • Service Users: If you are supplying a service such as counselling or house visits, then, you are processing personal information; therefore, you will be impacted by the GDPR. In many cases, this service involves the processing of sensitive personal information such as religious information or information relating to health or even criminal convictions, which requires even tighter control.

  • Financial information: If you are in receipt of donations from individuals through an on-line facility, then, you are processing personal information. Have you thought about the security measures, how easy would it be for an outsider to hack your system? The GDPR calls out for tightened security measures; therefore, you are likely to be impacted by the GDPR.

  • Opt-in versus opt-out: Out of all the new provisions of the GDPR, we have found this provision has caused the most concern amongst charities. Under the current E-Privacy Directive, it is not lawful to automatically opt-in a donor to receive marketing communication electronically. The GDPR reinforces this by stating “silence, pre-ticked boxes or inactivity should not constitute consent”.

  • Profiling: If you are profiling your donors, then, you are collecting personal information and you are obliged to comply with the requirements. Profiling is a conscious process of segmenting or extracting a data sample using automated means. If a decision is being made about an individual (either manually or automatically) then, at minimum, a Fair Processing notice will be required. If a decision is being made using sensitive personal information, then, explicit opt-in is required prior to the process being performed. There are new provisions surrounding consent; therefore, if you are profiling then you are likely to be impacted by the GDPR.

  • Timescales for Subject Access Requests: Under the GDPR, the timescale that an organisation has to respond to a Subject Access Request reduces from 40 days to one month. Emails relating to an individual are within the scope of a Subject Access Request. If a client or an employee has a history spanning years with your charity, then, you need to consider how you will retrieve each piece of information relating to this individual within the new tighter timeframe.

  • Third Party agreements: Most, if not all, organisations will engage third parties at some point. When this engagement involves the third party processing (which includes having the potential to access) personal data as held by the Data Controller, then, a Data Processing Agreement must be in place. However, GDPR places new requirements upon Data Controllers regarding allocating responsibility between the Controller and the Processor. Whilst the GDPR will prompt many organisations into reassessing their Data Processor Agreements, it will also prompt many Data Controllers to put Data Processor Agreements in place where they did not previously exist.  The GDPR will require that certain mandatory clauses are included in all contracts with your third party data processors as previously reported by Sytorus http://www.sytorus.com/Blog/Article/75/suggested-clauses-for-the-data-processor-contract    Some third parties are less obvious than others; have you considered IT Support, CCTV providers, Hosting companies?

  • Consent to process personal data: If you solely rely on consent as a means to process personal data, then, you may be impacted by the GDPR. Whilst consent remains a valid basis for processing data, it will be more difficult to rely on as a sole means to legitimately process data. Under the GDPR, where the Data Controller is collecting personal data, the Data Controller must be able to reference which lawful processing condition (as described in Article 6 for personal data and Article 9 for sensitive personal data) that they are referencing for processing personal data.  

  • The requirement for a DPO: According to Article 37 of the GDPR, it will be mandatory to appoint a DPO if the processing is carried out by a public authority; or if the core activities or the controller or the processor consist of processing operations that involve regular and systemic monitoring of data subjects on a large scale; or if the core activities of the controller or processor consist of processing on a large scale special categories of data as listed in Article 9 of the GDPR. If your charity is based on providing ‘medical services’, then you are processing special categories of data; therefore, you may be impacted by this requirement in the GDPR. It is worthwhile reviewing the data your charity processes and whether it qualifies as ‘large scale’. If so, then your charity is impacted by the GDPR.

Some pitfalls worth noting:

  • Policies in place but…:  The GDPR bases itself on getting companies to produce evidence of compliance.  Many organisations obtain a suite of policies, insert company name and get the staff to sign a training record; however, this is not complete evidence of compliance. Instead, this is the scaffolding that you generate your evidence of compliance from. For these policies to be evidence of compliance, you need to be generating logs or completing forms out of them. You also need to review policies regularly for currency and effectiveness, such review generates further evidence of compliance.

  • Getting company buy-in: Appointing a DPO will be a mandatory requirement for some organisations as described in the GDPR. When the DPO has been appointed, they do not operate in isolation from the company. Just like an organisation may appoint a Safety Rep from each area, so too should a Data Protection Champion be appointed from each area within the organisation. Such individuals take ownership of data protection risks as listed in the company risk profile. This promotes Data Protection as being a company-wide responsibility and not merely just the DPO’s responsibility.

  • Excel spreadsheets: There will be a requirement within the Irish jurisdiction that your logs be in ‘electronic format’ and ‘available for sharing’ with the Commissioner. Excel spreadsheets have limitations and some security risks depending on how they are configured. In particular, there is no audit trail on an entry to an Excel Spreadsheet; it would be too easy for an entry to be accidentally deleted and there is no record of who, what, where, when, why. Your logs should, ideally, have an audit trail for every entry. Even if you only restrict the usage to one single individual, entries could still be deleted by mistake. Secondly, since the GDPR is heavily risk-based, it is ideal if the electronic logs evaluate the risk of your activity, yielding a go/no-go decision.  Furthermore, as you are logging your activity, the user should be able to select which lawful processing condition they are relying on to process the personal data, etc. Whatever electronic format you use, it should either have a risk-assessing capability or prompt the user to calculate the risk manually.

LIKECHARITY and Sytorus have teamed up to help charities comply with the new requirements of the GDPR. If you are concerned that your charity might be impacted by the GDPR, get in touch at (01) 557 24 25 or http://www.likecharity.com/privacyengine/

Social Media Campaigns That Rise Above

In the fast-paced and highly saturated world of social media, it can be difficult to establish online presence and awareness. Ideal content will attract not only attention but rewarding engagement and interaction. Establishing an online presence is only the first step for companies. Next they must master the skill of standing out from their competitors, and avoid being drowned out by the high traffic nature of social media. This begs the question: how does one create a unique voice on social media? In the world of constant content, how do you create the one campaign that catches attention? The following are just a few examples of some unique and innovative ideas in recent social media campaigns.

#KnowYourLemons

In February, Worldwide Breast Cancer launched a highly successful campaign that summarizes the importance of self check-ups, recognizing warning signs, and other important information about breast cancer as translated through lemons. The campaign is ingenious for a few reasons: it is simple, easy to understand, and it manages to summarize a large amount of crucial information into a basic and easily digestible format. It created a catchy campaign name and concept, managed to double not only as awareness but also as incentive to donate to Worldwide Breast Cancer, and started a conversation and community around the subject. The campaign perfectly strikes the balance between serious and lighthearted. Through just three Facebook posts, the campaign reached 7.3 million people.

#EndTheStigma

This viral sensation was started not by an organization, but by just one person: twenty-eight year old Kat Selwyn Layton. After the passing of mental health advocate Carrie Fisher, Layton was inspired to speak out more publicly in her own life about mental illness and wanted to encourage others to do the same.  She created highly shareable online badges that featured all variations of mental illnesses and conditions. The badge featured the campaign name #EndTheStigma, with other hashtags of support such as #1in5, bringing awareness to the statistic that one in five American adults are living with a mental illness. This initiative is brilliant, as it takes an extremely direct approach. The simple campaign works towards dealing with shame, breaking silence around misunderstood or marginalized illnesses and creating a highly accessible and positive online mental health movement. The badges have been shared over 40 000 times on Facebook alone.

#LongestDay

Dublin Simon, a homeless charity in Dublin Ireland runs an awareness campaign on the day of the summer solstice, also known as the longest day of the year. The campaign centered around awareness for the homeless and a call to action to donate, simply through the message of "Everyday feels like the longest day of the year for those who are homeless". This campaign is extremely clever due to its ability to link a day you may otherwise think little of to its mission, and providing incentive to donate and get people thinking about its simple, but highly effective and shareable message.

#EndangeredEmoji

Seventeen of the animal emojis found on smartphone keyboards were highlighted as endangered by World Wildlife Fund, and the organization took to Twitter as an opportunity to raise awareness and generate donations. For every retweet or tweet of one of these endangered species, €0.10 was donated to WWF for awareness and conservation efforts. Strategically launched on World Endangered Species Day, this campaign is brilliant in that it could be re-run, with an updated list of endangered species that need help the following year. It is appealing to all ages, easy to get involved in, and makes great use of the easily understood and communicated tool and trend of emojis. As well, it gives an opportunity to give a visual for the endangered animal in an endearing way. The campaign generated over a million uses of the hashtag #Endangered Emoji, and thousands of followers gained to the WWF Twitter account.

These campaigns show how they were able to reach a larger audience and find success by taking unique approaches to their messages of awareness. Creating highly shareable content that can either appeal or at least interest a wide variety of people is a huge victory. When content online becomes viral, it becomes powerful.

References

https://econsultancy.com/blog/68758-the-best-social-media-campaigns-and-stories-from-january-2017

https://www.searchenginejournal.com/social-media-marketing-campaign-examples/192583/

https://twitter.com/Dublin_Simon?lang=en

http://mashable.com/2017/01/06/mental-illness-badges-endthestigma/#ozbovfUIHiqx

What is Compassion Fatigue and How to Prevent It

The purpose of advertisements for charities is to invoke a psychological response, triggered by complex emotions usually through the means of storytelling. Guilt is a common approach that charities try to conjure out of their audience. Charity adverts want to call upon ‘anticipatory guilt’ which is the feeling of guilt that follows or precedes inaction. This is caused by the underlying awareness of one’s responsibility to avoid or help avoid someone experiencing an unfortunate occurrence. Increased sense of guilt of being responsible for others misfortune increases financial contributions. In a study, they found that in charity advertisements, guilt appeals to a stronger donation intention than with non-guilt appeals. The same study also found that the impact of guilt appeals on donation intention will be mediated by a sense of responsibility. This high sense of responsibility could potentially increase the chances of a person donating more than once as well.

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A charity's advertisement induces a ‘two-sided effect,' compassion and proximity, on the one hand, and distantiation on the other. What causes the reaction of creating this emotional distance is the distrust of an advertisement or charity, or also caused by compassion fatigue. Distrust can be brought about by the ad itself, i.e., the advertisement has a high production value (this can have the audience question where their donations would be going, to the charity or advertisements). Compassion fatigue can be caused by a long advertisement with multiple examples of suffering, or too many adverts in an acute time frame. Too much guilt can be counterproductive and make audiences not want to donate, due to the consistent invasive feelings of guilt and pity.

Imagery is an important facet to a charity’s advertisement. It gives the audience a visual of the suffering, the foundation is trying to prevent or eradicate. Depictions of suffering can provide evidence of the charity’s cause, giving the audience proof that their donations are very much needed. Thus directly creating the feeling of responsibility among audience viewers. Images that express too much suffering to the point of being grotesque could turn people off from watching or looking at your charities advertisement. There needs to be a balance. A gory image can be impactful if done correctly. A common term for grotesque imagery in adverts is “shock advertising” which takes an image that is riding on the edge of unwatchable and uses it to shock people into either paying attention or donating to the cause, its depictions that will make people question why [whatever is happening in the picture] it is happening.

Positive imagery, recently, has been used a lot more, to prevent compassion fatigue. Positive imagery usually consists of how donations could help who or what is suffering. Charities can also use images of volunteers or fundraisers they have had, show a group of people willingly advocate or fundraise for a cause. Donors who are exposed to positive charity adverts made donations worth 45% more on average. A study has shown that individuals who are surrounded or are exposed to people expressing pro-social behavior have a tendency to do the same, thus making pro-social behaviour the norm. This can increase not only donations but also increase willingness to volunteer and spread awareness of your cause.

There is a thin line between being emotionally invasive enough for the audience to experience pro-social behavior and being too intrusive that people will switch to another channel or ignore the advertisement. A ‘good’ advertisement can have negative aspects to it as long as there is some ultimate goal or positive response to the issue. Good charity ads invoke emotions and give that push to support the cause instinctually. ‘Good’ advert in this context means an advertisement that increases support and draw in new supporters. DRTV adverts can do just that; these adverts are analysed in live time, and can be edited to fit the charities core message. LIKECHARITY has production team that specialises in media buying and creative management to get the most out of the advert. Usually, a good DRTV advertisement share a story that is concise while creating a foundation for the charity’s purpose. This will create a more consolidated following which means more donations.

 

Reference:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/hide-and-seek/201406/rhetoric-made-easy

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Debra_Basil/publication/229181491_Guilt_Appeals_The_Mediating_Effect_of_Responsibility/links/02e7e534d83beba08f000000.pdf

http://www.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/mediaWorkingPapers/MScDissertationSeries/2012/84.pdf

https://www.theguardian.com/voluntary-sector-network/2012/aug/30/charities-should-abandon-shock-advertising

https://pixabay.com/en/group-women-running-pink-absurd-524470/

https://pixabay.com/en/volunteer-hands-help-colors-2055015/

https://pixabay.com/en/donate-charity-giving-give-aid-654328/

https://www.theguardian.com/voluntary-sector-network/2012/aug/30/charities-should-abandon-shock-advertising

Recurring Payment Text-to-Donate Launches in Ireland!

Recurring Payment Text-to-Donate Launches in Ireland!
 

Do you want to expand your charity’s fundraising horizons, but aren’t sure if you should ask for a single text-to-donate gift or a recurring direct debit instead ? Do you want to increase donation revenue without necessarily increasing your current advertising budget?

Then this is the solution for you!

Recurring SMS is new to the Irish charity sector and can make donating a lot easier for the donating public. Recurring SMS is similar to the extremely popular text-to-donate service except that it will charge the texter’s phone bill every week or every month (that bit is up to you!). This service makes it easy for your supporters to donate on a regular basis just by sending a couple of simple text messages.

Recurring SMS is an exciting and important new donor acquisition channel in Ireland. In the UK, charities have found that an average recurring donor gives 42% more annually compared to one-time donor. Recurring SMS is a fantastic new tool that can help you reach your fundraising targets.

Recurring SMS is simple and straightforward. This will allow your supporter to donate without constantly texting in to donate. The recurring SMS is a safe and secure way of delivering financial gifts from supporters to their chosen charity.

LIKECHARITY’s new recurring text-to-donate service is very simple to use and access. If you would like to learn more about Recurring SMS, please email deirdre.mullen@likecharity.com, call 01 557 2425 or visit http://www.likecharity.com/recurring-sms

What to Know About Data Protection

We all are somewhat afraid of the commissioner knocking on the door of non-profits and asking to see how the organisation is keeping donors’ sensitive personal data ethically protected which is why LIKECHARITY have teamed up with SYTORUS to help you with the overwhelming task of becoming a GDPR compliant.

First we have to talk about what the GDPR is; it stands for the General Data Protection Regulation, it is a document that will enforce data protection policies on organisations all over the EU. The GDPR will be implemented on the 25th of May 2018 by the EU parliament. Here are some of the key changes that will occur:

1. Increased Territorial Scope: Regardless of the location or what kind of company you run, if you process any kind of personal data through your organisaiton, the GDPR applies to you. If you provide goods and services to EU citizens then you are required by law to implement this regulation in your organisation..

2. Penalties: If there is a breach of GDPR your organisation can be fined up to 4% of annual global turnover or €20 Million. For example potential actions classed by the commissioners as an serious infringement for non-profits is not getting the proper consent from a potential donor to use their personal data in analysis, in tracking trends, or to transfer their personal data to other organisations.

3. Consent: you will no longer be allowed to use long ambiguous terms and conditions, now your organisation are only allowed to give a coherent and accessible form of terms and conditions so that your donors have the proper agency to consent. Your terms and conditions should be transparent and in language that can be easily understood.

4. Breach Notification: When there is a data breach in your charity it is required that donors and controllers be notified within 72 hours of the breach.

5. Right to Access: Completely changes the manner of transparency between the donor and charity. The donor can request access to their personal information to discover the charity’s intentions and purpose for holding personal data. While also providing transparency of where the data is being stored or used.

6. Right to be Forgotten: the right of the donor’s personal information to be erased from the database of the charity and to halt the distribution of this information publicly. This right can be enacted when the information is not relevant anymore or that the consent of the customer is withdrawn.

7. Data Probability: this is the right of the client to receive personal data about them from the charity transfer another charity of the client’s choosing.

8. Privacy by design: all systems and protocols call for data protection. Everything the company does with any kind of data needs to include a formula for data protection, not just an added service.

Given all of these changes, charities have to be prepared to enforce them in order to avoid fines and remain compliant.

To be a GDPR guru, it’s important that you understand the regulation rhetoric used in the document. Here are some policy jargon that may come up:

  • Processing: to complete operations involving data through the means of computers, letters, to classify information

  • Restriction of processing: limits what a data controller can do with personal data.

  • Profiling: automated processing of personal data, that helps analyse and predict, behaviors, interests, work conduct, and economic situations.

  • Pseudonymisation: a form of processing of personal information that doesn’t allow the connection between the data and the data subject without additional information from them.

  • Filing system: personal data can be accessed only with specific criteria,on a functional or geographical basis.

  • Genetic data: personal data related to heredity, genetic characteristics, unique information about their physiological state, and health status.

  • Biometric Data: specific technical processing of physical, physiological, and natural behavior of a person. ie. Facial images.

  • Cross-Border Processing: processing of personal data specifically of activities of a member of state in a controller establishment or a processor establishment, while being in either in a single or multiple enterprise(s).

  • Main Establishment: for a controller in enterprises in more than one members of state, the central establishment is considered the main establishment, until another the controller has made the decision of making another establishment the main one. For a processor in establishments in more than one member of state, the central administration is considered the main establishment, unless there is no central administration, then wherever the data is being processed is considered the main establishment while they are also subject to specific obligations are under this regulation.

  • Representative: a person that is designated by the controller or processor to represent the establishment with their various obligations under the regulations.

  • Binding Corporate Rules: personal data protection policies when personal data is transferred between a controller and a processor or transferred between controller and third party or processor and third party or transferred between groups that are engaged in joint economic activity.

  • Supervisory Authority: independent public authority

LIKECHARITY and Sytorus had come together to offer LIKECHARITY Privacy Engine, which is a new data protection engine that will prepare for the GDPR that will be implemented next year. It provides data protection support, guidance, and training all in one. This allows your charity to thrive while being conscious of how your data is protected. If you would like to learn more about LIKECHARITY Privacy Engine, please click here .

 

References:

http://www.eugdpr.org/eugdpr.org.html

http://www.eugdpr.org/the-regulation.html

http://www.lewik.org/term/13563/restriction-of-processing-definitions-gdpr/

http://www.lewik.org/tree/?node=13582

https://www.flickr.com/photos/134794750@N07/32457814122/in/photolist-4vhGkq-QdjpYm-RsbMjS